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reform law took effect today. hospitals will face big fines if too many of their medicare patients have to be readmitted lookse of complications. we asked anna werner to look into this. >> reporter: so this is everything you have to take? >> yes. >> reporter: 84-year-old phil eckloff suffers from congestive heart failure and diabetes and wound up in the hospital twice ais year. l twice a laundry list of follow-up instructions and fedications. so you have to deal with all this stuff. this is a lot of-- a lot of medications. a lot to remember. >> yeah, it is. >> reporter: eckloff is fortunate. f isas a home health care worker to help him. what do you think it would be like for you if you had to keep y with all this by yourself? >> if you don't take a service like this you'll end up become you'llhospital. and that's true. >> reporter: federal officials ere concerned that many medicare patients fail to get the necessary follow-up care and end up being readmitted to the hospital, often in the same tnth. so the government is now penalizing hospitals for excessive readmissions in three areas:
a hearing today on a challenge to the state law that requires voters to show a photo i.d. the judge has until tuesday to rule. and we asked wyatt andrews to fill us in on what's at stake. >> was this easy to get or too hard to get? >> it was very hard to get. >> reporter: 68-year-old doris rkark was turned down three ng fs applying for her pennsylvania voter i.d. card, nd every time, she says, the state wanted another document-- original birth certificate, original social security card. then she needed her husband's death certificate, when a clerk demanded proof of her married name. after four tries she got the card but resented all the obstacles. >> you feel like why am i going arough all these things? i'm not bin laden's wife, you know. i've been here all my life. vove been voting since it's been legal for me to vote. >> reporter: clark's testimony in state court in pennsylvania represents a growing legal challenge to voter i.d. laws, specifically, how difficult some cuates have made it for voters to actually get the cards, more likely to live in poverty. >> hey, hey, ho-ho- >> report
is used everyday by t.s.a. officers, border agents and state, local, and federal law enforcements. >> if you're speeding, you get pulled over, they're query that name. and if they're encountering a known or suspected terrorist it will pop up and say "call the terrorist screening center." >> reporter: how often do these encounters happen? >> we're averaging about 55 encounters with known or suspected terrorists every single day. >> reporter: in most cases, the encounters do not produce arrest but provide additional intelligence. >> location of where the guy is going, what he's doing, additional associates that the subject is hanging around. >> reporter: names are frequently added and subtracted, always in secret. healy also overseas the even more critical no-fly list. there are 20,000 people on the no-fly list. about 700 of them are americans. so there are people who live in this country who you have enough concerns about they can't fly? >> yes. >> reporter: the databases are not perfect. some innocent people have been kept off airplanes by mistake. and one person who never made th
supplements because federal law classifies them as food not drugs. products are required to be safe but the f.d.a. only monitors them after they're on the market. when it comes to proof, supplement makers are only required to say research has been done, they are not required to show it to the f.d.a. the natural products association-- the main trade group of the supplement industry-- issued a statement saying: the investigators looked at 127 supplements that claim to boost the immune system or help with weight loss. none-- none-- met all of the f.d.a.'s recommendations for proving the products actually work. >> pelley: and we should mention, jon, the report we're referring to was produced today by the department of health and human services. there's another medical story that we're following tonight, jon, a deadly outbreak of meningitis. it has spread to five states, 26 people have been infected, four have died. a suspected source is tainted steroid injections that is used to treat back pain. the medication came from a pharmacy in massachusetts that issued a recall last week. jon, what have yo
medicare to the american association of retired persons in new orleans, he got an earful. >> the law turned medicare boo into a piggy bank for obamacare! (boos) >> reporter: that frosty reaction is borne out in new polling, both by cbs news and others which found more people thought the president would do a better job handling medicare than governor romney. the "washington post" and kaiser foundation surveyed voters in virginia, ohio, and florida. in those states that found that sajorities of 56%, 59%, and 65% support maintaining medicare's current system of benefits. in flagler beach, florida, walt azie has some serious questions for romney. >> i think romney will turn the economy around but it's the other issues that we don't know about. >> reporter: like what? >> like the medicare, health care issues. >> reporter: in haymarket, virginia, life-long republican dan stapleton echoes fears about the romney/ryan ticket. >> i think they want to change ot so dramatically that we won't recognize it quite as medicare once they're done. >> reporter: by balancing the ticket with ryan, an advocate of
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)